Jump to content



Photo

How to convince my players try Grimm?


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Valyar

Valyar

    Member

  • Members
  • 26 posts

Posted 03 February 2009 - 06:49 AM

Recently I saw that thing - Grimm, and was impressed by the book cover illustration, and started to search for some more info on this strange little book. Now I read the forum and have read the old horizon-ff book. I have to say I very very liked the idea, it's like the move Grimm Brothers.

I really enjoyed all interpretation on Grimm characters and the idea of the book, but I found a little problem - all people I play with are let's say mature and over 23-24 years, and don't seem to find playing "childs", especially some strange one-time system entertaining. On the other hand, I think Grimm can be used like breath of air between long campaigns or when there are people lacking from session. If you faced similar problems, what you think is the best way to approach my players?



#2 LeBlanc13

LeBlanc13

    Member

  • Members
  • 672 posts

Posted 17 March 2009 - 10:46 AM

I'm not one to give advice on this as I was laughed at when I suggested giving it a try in my gaming group.

Have you tried gunpoint? :)

I had very similar issues to what you experienced. I brought out the book and let them flip through and look at it. They all seemed very adamant against playing children. Not only that, but playing in a twisted/fractured fairy tale also didn't appeal to them.

All around, I've got a very good reading book that I can plunder for campaign ideas, but I'm not certain I'll ever be able to get anyone to try it.

 



#3 BlueKnight

BlueKnight

    Member

  • Members
  • 3 posts

Posted 18 March 2009 - 04:08 PM

Sounds like the little kids in your groups are all grown up and will never get to Never-never Land. How sad.

Keep trying, and have something ready for them. A night when everyone anticipates boredom may be a good time to pull out the story for them. Also, maybe around holidays, a time when novelty tends to appeal to people.

Good Luck!

-BK



#4 Guest_Not In Sample_*

Guest_Not In Sample_*
  • Guests

Posted 19 March 2009 - 10:51 AM

 Im no Grimm player. I own the book though, as it is a FFG product.

You imply that you play other RPGs. Which ones?

Doesn't matter and don't care

What I reccomend is adding these fairytale elements into your DnD, Warhammer, Exalted, Scion...etc. If you do this correctly then they will start to become that kid again.

No one ever "leaves neverland". People just get older and realise the real world isn't as pretty as it was as a kid. Have you ever heard of Gary Gygax? His dungeons are notorious for fairytale like encounters. 

If you are playing dark heresy then place the characters in an abandoned theme park ran by a mad man or have an assassin or hunter chasing them. They did this in Batman with Riddler and Mad Hatter, Marvel with Arcade and Mojo, and Cowboy Bebop. 

If its already in a fantasy world like Warhammer fantasy, then introduce Mordheim. Bears riddin tricycles and weird freak shows. 

The point of Grimm is not that you are a kid. Its that you are an outsider to a world that doesn't play fair. So just do that with your next session for whatever RPG yuu are running. 

If you do this right then they should actually enjoy not feeling like they are in a predictable universe. Maybe for no reason the place they next visit has talking toads giving orders to goblins. When they try to discover why this is happening don't give them a reason. Eventually they will start to realise that in this part of the world things don't follow the same rules.



#5 Valyar

Valyar

    Member

  • Members
  • 26 posts

Posted 31 March 2009 - 04:46 AM

Darkkami, I really liked your idea! I am playing D&D most of the time, but from time to time L5R and  Dark Hersy. I will try to put here and there some small encounters to hook them and make them smile, then approach them with already made heroes (because I know nobody likes to read 1000 pages just to try one session) and suggest them to give it a try.

I think your idea will fit perfectly into a modern game (using True20 ruleset or even Cortex ruleset!



#6 SJBenoist

SJBenoist

    Member

  • Members
  • 32 posts

Posted 08 April 2009 - 05:20 AM

Valyar said:

I really enjoyed all interpretation on Grimm characters and the idea of the book, but I found a little problem - all people I play with are let's say mature and over 23-24 years, and don't seem to find playing "childs", especially some strange one-time system entertaining. On the other hand, I think Grimm can be used like breath of air between long campaigns or when there are people lacking from session. If you faced similar problems, what you think is the best way to approach my players?

 

This may get better as your players age a little, say ... over 33. 

By that point some of the notions about playing children,  and some reactions to various dilemmas & threats, will look very different to players that have children themselves.

I hope you get to try the game.



#7 The Gremlin

The Gremlin

    Member

  • Members
  • 75 posts

Posted 24 June 2010 - 07:22 AM

The only reason children are used is because it makes the game a lot scarier when you take the innocent and make their life miserable. They're also supposed to be a lot weaker than the antagonists.

It sounds like your friends think that Grimm is a kid's game because you play kids in it. Something like Fablehaven, or Spiderwick or the Sisters Grimm. Perhaps if you introduced them to the more mature side of the game, they might reconsider. However, no offense, but they may not be mature enough to handle that if they can't handle this.

Just an idea: What if you let them play adults? However, they'd have to be cowardly, somewhat dimwitted, very frail, or the like. You'd have to come up with entirely new statistics for them, though.






© 2013 Fantasy Flight Publishing, Inc. Fantasy Flight Games and the FFG logo are ® of Fantasy Flight Publishing, Inc.  All rights reserved.
Privacy Policy | Terms of Use | Contact | User Support | Rules Questions | Help | RSS