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Can you play this game one person?


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#1 mr.thomasschmidt

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Posted 15 October 2011 - 07:35 AM

Well, just wanna know if it's possible to play this game solo as I don't really have anyone to play with. 



#2 sigmazero13

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Posted 15 October 2011 - 11:22 AM

 Unfortunately, not really.  You could probably play "against yourself" by playing both sides of a 2-player game, but it wouldn't be as enjoyable since there's a lot of hidden information and trying to outguess your opponent.



#3 Steve-O

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Posted 16 October 2011 - 02:00 PM

mr.thomasschmidt said:

Well, just wanna know if it's possible to play this game solo as I don't really have anyone to play with. 

No you can't, but if you spend a little time hanging out at the local gaming store, you can probably find people to play it with.

Sometimes I worry about the newest generation of board gamers.  Has the internet and online gaming in general really isolated people to the point where they don't go out and make friends locally?

No personal offense intended, Schmidtty, it just seems to me like there's an awful lot of people these days who only play board games solo and I have to wonder if that's really because there's actually no one around them or if they just aren't looking because they spend so much time socializing online.  Getting together with friends is one of the primary reasons I enjoy board gaming, so this question makes me a sad panda. =(



#4 sigmazero13

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Posted 17 October 2011 - 06:21 AM

Steve-O said:

No personal offense intended, Schmidtty, it just seems to me like there's an awful lot of people these days who only play board games solo and I have to wonder if that's really because there's actually no one around them or if they just aren't looking because they spend so much time socializing online.  Getting together with friends is one of the primary reasons I enjoy board gaming, so this question makes me a sad panda. =(

Well, in my case, while I do have my brother nearby and a few friends I can game with, when I eventually move to the north end of Denver, my local gaming options will be slimmed quite a bit.  Unfortunately, for me, it's not online socializing that would make it difficult to find other gamers, but rather lack of time; my family eats a lot of my time.  With those I game with now, they can come to my house and we can game - and that allows me to help out with the kids where needed.  If I were to go to a local game store, it would put a lot more stress on my wife, and while I love gaming, I'd rather not have a stressed out wife :)

Thus, right now, most of the games I get these days are those that can be played solo, or with 2 or 3 players.  When my kids are older, I obviously can game with them, and will have more time to find other gamers locally, but unfortunately right now it's just easier said than done :)



#5 Mestre dos Magos

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 02:42 AM

Let me tell you my little experience on finding and meeting new friends.

I am very new to the hobby, altough I compulsivelly bought a lot of games, I have found modern board games only last year.

About 3 years ago I moved to a new city due to work, and so, didnt know anyone around.

I digged into the internet, and found out a discussion group in yahoo about a group of people that gathered to play board games here. They did this once every two months.

So I got in contact even not knowing anyone, and I was very well received.

The first day I was a bit nervous, but a few hours into the night and I was laughing and making friends. I started to learn that board game players love most of all is to meet new people!

A couple of meetings, and I found this new group of people coming in... and I saw in their faces they were very shy.

I invited them to play Battlestar Galactica, and 4 hours later, a short trip to a burger king, and lots of laughs later, we exchanged emails and phones, and I actually even found one of the couples were my neighbors :)

 

We meet now almost every week, sometimes even twice a week...

 

Do not be afraid to go out alone, into a meeting or store...there are so many unmet friends out there, that in no time you will be more worried that you have too many people to play with, instead of too little :)

 

 



#6 North_Wolf

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Posted 16 November 2011 - 12:24 AM

You can play this solo, but its not a perfect experience.  Just pointing out that its not impossible, I have had fun with test games (learning rules). 

You kind of have to force yourself to do the "best action if you didnt know better" for alot of things.  It can become quite akward for things like bidding wars (might need to randomize it), but you can have some fun with it.

Its still far from a perfect experience, unless you are dedicated to playing the game for its own sake and seeing what faction can pull off a win I would not recomend it. 

Owning the game when the kids are old enough is a plus.  :)

Arkham Horror rules is the best  solo game though (IMO).

 

 

 



#7 Curator

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Posted 18 November 2011 - 11:25 AM

Steve-O said:

 

Sometimes I worry about the newest generation of board gamers.  Has the internet and online gaming in general really isolated people to the point where they don't go out and make friends locally?

 



Trust me I see this all the time. I just had this conversation with a buddy about why Skyrim is overrated. And why I prefer a game called Wakfu over it for my video game addiction.

 

Thanks to Facebook, MMOs, and blogs, society has found a way to be who they "WANT" to be. They can pretend to be someone they are not, they can voice their true opinion, and some horrible face to face liars can get away with lying to others about who they are or their (lack of) accomplishments. Having access to this ability to forever remain behind an anonymous screen has created a false sense of security.  As a side effect, this has instilled a deep-seated fear into the subconscious about never being accepted for who they really are.

This is why the newer generation of gamers would rather play epic board games solo rather than face to face. Many newer faces to gaming are afraid of embarrassing themselves and would rather not take the risks presented to them by mingling with a crowd.  

Roleplaying games will eventually be catered to groups of friends and not so much a local community thing. This is why the new 4.0 is made with improv put on the back-burner for DnD. Magic and card games on the other hand, won't be affected because they require very little speech and thus hold very low chance of saying something stupid. The funny thing I have noticed from my observations of these anti-social personas is how unafraid they are when it comes time to bragging and usually making a fool of themselves in the process.

For others it is just the fear of losing that keeps them in their "safe zone".

Some days I really wish the internet would crash for a week just to see people climb out of their shells.



#8 North_Wolf

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Posted 19 November 2011 - 06:54 AM

While where this topic is going has some merit (on how its become easier to be a shut in hermit if you happen to want to be), there are alot of people that prefer solo games due to time constraints and lack of interested players.

I can play a solo game of Arkham Horror in spurts and finish it in a week if I just want to sit down with it after a work day (12 hours), I´m assuming this would suit alot of other people in a similar situation (lack of time).  There is a big appeal in the low time investment needed for single player gaming, locating new players, setting up a time with them and playing a whole game through might not fit everyones agenda (spouses, freinds, kids and reletives might eat up to much with other activities).

I´m lucky enough to have gotten most of my freinds to try and enjoy my hobby, I also have kids that enjoy games and a wife that plays some games on occasion (including Arkham wich she is fond of). 

I still find myself sitting down for a solo game of Arkham, or take a trial run on games I havent managed to play enough (RuneWars included) on my own.

Way back in the day, I would ignore my freinds asking me to come out , only to to have a good solo session of gaming with my Sinclair Spectrum 48kb, so I dont think we are seeing a new trend with human nature.  :)  Sometimes solo is good., Skyrim is a good example of a rare direction actually, its a solo game where most games today tend to focus on multiplayer (with strangers or freinds).  Just my two cents into the pot.



#9 KevinBakon

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Posted 19 November 2011 - 02:24 PM

When I pick up a new game, I'll try and do a run through it by myself before I play with friends.  I want to get a feel for the rules and see if I can identify any confusing stuff early.  I'm assuming that's fairly common.  Yes?

As for gamer sociability, my understanding is that board gaming has been becoming more and more popular in recent years.  If that is true, I think we have social networks and video games to thank for it! 






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