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Using multiple movements to solve a puzzle in a turn?


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#1 arcana10

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Posted 03 March 2011 - 12:42 PM

If an investigator is unable to solve a puzzle on the first attempt, is it possible to use a second movement to immediately retry the puzzle, or is it required to wait until the next turn?

 

I couldn't find anything specific in the rulebook on this.

 



#2 valvorik

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Posted 03 March 2011 - 12:49 PM

Page 18, bottom of left column - you can only attempt to solve a puzzle once per turn.  So, you interrupted your movement or action, if you fail you have whatever was left in your turn left but you can't try the puzzle again that turn.

Rob



#3 Toom

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Posted 03 March 2011 - 12:58 PM

 But remember, you can use a skill points AT ANY TIME during a puzzle (normally they must be declared before the die roll).

 

Not sure if you can use more than 1 skillpoint during a turn on a puzzle.



#4 valvorik

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Posted 03 March 2011 - 01:04 PM

In both the Skill Point rule on page 13 and the Skill Points in Puzzles bit on page 18 it says "spend a skill point" or "may discard one skill point"  etc.(singular reference) and I interpret that to mean "you can only spend one at a time" (not sure as player I would want to blow through more than 1 at a time)



#5 dvang

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Posted 04 March 2011 - 04:04 AM

Agreed. We had interpreted the use of skill points to be a single one per test as maximum as well.



#6 Kazi

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Posted 04 March 2011 - 04:23 AM

We also use that as well.. also I should mention just because of the title of the forum, that you use your action to solve a puzzle not use movement, however if you move into a space with an lock puzzle the player gets one attempt at it for free (not to be confused with obstacle cards with locks like the puzzle box or suitcase).

When you try to enter a room the lock card gets turned over and you get a free attempt at the puzzle. Then when you explore the room the obstacle card get turned over if there is a puzzle you'd get a free attempt at it, and if you resolve the obstacle the other cards get turned over. This is why Dark Room is a lock not an obstacle. If you fail to resolve either a lock or a obstacle puzzle you'd have to spend an action to try it again.

Also if you cannot bypass a lock, either because you don't have the item or failed the puzzle lock you get no more movement this turn - this is for lock cards only, not obstacle cards (pg 8 of the rules of play)



#7 dvang

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Posted 04 March 2011 - 05:11 AM

Actually, reading the rules, you don't lose all your movement for the turn:

rulebook pg8

During an investigator’s Movement Step, he may move his figure
to one adjacent space. Since an investigator may perform two
Movement Steps during his turn, he may move up to two spaces
and perform an action (which could be to possibly move to a
third space).

You get TWO Movement Steps in a turn.

If the player is unable to discard the proper card or solve the
puzzle, then he cannot enter the room this turn (and wasted
this Movement Step). When a moving investigator encounters
an ability saying “this door is locked,” his figure remains in its
current room and cannot move for this Movement Step.

Note that is says the player wasted "this" Movement Step, and cannot move for "this" Movement Step.  So, the investigator wastes the Movement Step he used to try to enter the locked room. However, if that was his first Movement Step, the investigator still has a second Movement Step with which to move. Do note that it specifically says that failing to succeed vs the lock means the investigator cannot enter the room this TURN, so using the second Movement Step to attempt the lock a second time is invalid.

Keep in mind that a LOCK puzzle is not an obstacle, so you cannot use an action as well as a movement, and vice versa. So, a single investigator will never be able to attempt a single puzzle twice in the same turn.



#8 Titeman

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Posted 04 March 2011 - 05:12 AM

Kazi said:

We also use that as well.. also I should mention just because of the title of the forum, that you use your action to solve a puzzle not use movement, however if you move into a space with an lock puzzle the player gets one attempt at it for free (not to be confused with obstacle cards with locks like the puzzle box or suitcase).

When you try to enter a room the lock card gets turned over and you get a free attempt at the puzzle. Then when you explore the room the obstacle card get turned over if there is a puzzle you'd get a free attempt at it, and if you resolve the obstacle the other cards get turned over. This is why Dark Room is a lock not an obstacle. If you fail to resolve either a lock or a obstacle puzzle you'd have to spend an action to try it again.

Also if you cannot bypass a lock, either because you don't have the item or failed the puzzle lock you get no more movement this turn - this is for lock cards only, not obstacle cards (pg 8 of the rules of play)

Kazi said:

... that you use your action to solve a puzzle not use movement...

I don't think this is entirely true. Whenever you attempt a puzzle it is part of the action or movement step you are currently taking. If a Lock has a puzzle and you fail to solve it, another Investigator (or you on a future turn) would take a Movement step to enter the room, giving you another try at it.

From what I can tell in the rules Obstacle puzzles are part of the Exploration step; there is no puzzle "action"...


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Do not meddle in the affairs of Dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup...

#9 Kazi

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Posted 04 March 2011 - 06:24 AM

Thanks dvang and titeman! You right, I missed read the Investigator turn information. I was thinking that the movement step gave you up to 2 movement not that you got two movement steps.

And I guess I was just thinking of scenario 5 when it comes to using an action to solve a puzzle as per clue card 1c. (I knew I read that somewhere) But that's what I get for trying to figure out the rules when I've had only a couple of hours of sleep.






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