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How do you combine your expansions?


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#21 I. J. Thompson

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Posted 05 April 2014 - 09:13 AM

I would love to just plug in the specific, desired expansion(s) for any particular game, but adding/removing so many cards before and after every game is just too much work for us. So, everything goes in.



#22 Bolithio

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 10:01 AM

My gaming group collectively owns every talisman expansion. We have all our sets separated and mix 2-4 sets together per game. We keep the board expansion cards in thier boxes and have the card sets bound by ruberbands in the main box. It takes about 5 extra minutes to break down the game at the end. While playing with everything is tempting, it tends to create a schizophrenic game experience. We like the flavor of various card/board sets and like to actually see it when we play.



#23 Bolithio

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 10:03 AM

We have been playing "Fire & Ice" allot lately. (Only Frostmarch and Firelands cards, no base cards). Super fun!


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#24 DomaGB

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 03:16 PM

Do not use rubber bands on cards! a friend of mine put an extra set of 2nd edition Talisman cards in a cupboard with rubberbands, when he went to move the rubber bands had hardened and dried to the cards. Top and bottom cards were destroyed, and several were damaged.

 

Last year I bought a used copy of 2nd edition, and it had the same problem. I lost 1-2 cards from rubberbands.

 

Rubber bands are evil and destroy talisman cards. Do not do it!

 

:angry:

 

I will have to confiscate those cards due to abuse!


RoboRally, then Talisman. That's the way it is... ;)


#25 Thels

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Posted 14 April 2014 - 07:16 PM

For the dragon expansion set, why not treat the dragon tower as a separate corner, instead of making it the center of the game?

PREPARING THE GAME:

At the start of the game, place the dragon tower adjacent to the main board, so that the "plain of peril" space on the dragon tower borders the graveyard space on the main board. (Since there is no village corner expansion yet, this should be easy. Once there is a village corner expansion, this might get a little tricky. It won't exactly fit for me, but I'm using the old 4th edition board, and the revised 4th edition is a tad larger, so it might still fit on the revised 4th edition board.)

Gather three dragon scales of each color and place them next to the dragon lords. Gather the remaining dragon tokens and stack them facedown next to the play area.

Shuffle the dragon lords face down, and flip one to determine the dragon king as normal. Then flip a second dragon lord and place two matching dragon scales from the pool of 9 dragon scales next to the dragon lords on that dragon lord. Place one matching dragon scale from the same pool on the third dragon lord. The dragon king starts without dragon scales.

GENERAL RULES CHANGES:

The "plain of peril" space on the dragon tower will from here on be called the dragon tower entrance. The "crown of command" space on the dragon tower will from here on be called the dragon throne. Any rules, cards or abilities that refer to the plain of peril or the crown of command refer to the matching spaces on the center of the main board, not the dragon tower (for example, the assassin is allowed to assassinate on the dragon throne).

Players do not draw a dragon scale token at the start of their turn.

Rules, cards and abilities that affect adventure cards affect dragon cards where appropriate. For example, if the prophetess is instructed to draw a red dragon card, she may discard that card and draw another card to replace it.

MOVEMENT IN THE DRAGON TOWER:

The dragon tower entrance is directly connected to the graveyard. Players that move across the outer region and pass the graveyard (or start their movement from the graveyard) may move into the dragon tower if they have sufficient movement remaining. This is not mandatory. Players may continue to travel along the outer region.

Players do not halt their movement on the dragon tower entrance, but continue movement as normal.

Players that start their turn or movement in the dragon tower do not draw any cards for the space they are currently in, but roll the dice for movement as normal. Players may choose to move higher up the tower (clockwise), or move towards the outer region (counterclockwise). Moving towards the outer region does not force players to continue moving towards the outer region during later turns. Players that arrive on the dragon throne must end their movement on that space.

Players do not advance towards the dragon throne after resolving the dragon cards that the player encountered, but instead rely on regular movement to advance.

Players that are defeated (by another player or by a creature) while on a staircase space move one space towards the dragon tower entrance (regardless of the direction the player was traveling in) in addition to the regular results of being defeated. However, the player does not encounter the new space (or any other player on that space).

The grim reaper and the werewolf may enter and leave the dragon tower just like any other character. When the grim reaper or the werewolf reaches the dragon throne, the player that moved the grim reaper or the werewolf must immediately move the grim reaper or the werewolf to any space in any region except the inner region and end his movement in that space.

ENCOUNTERING DRAGON TOWER SPACES:

Players do not encounter dragon tower spaces at the start of their turn, but when they land on them (unless they choose to encounter another player on the same space). When a player encounters a dragon tower space other than the dragon throne (so including the dragon tower entrance), the player must perform the following steps in order:

1. If your current space already contains a dragon scale, skip to step 4. (At the start of the game, there are no dragon scales on any of the dragon tower spaces.)

2. Draw a random dragon token. If you draw a dragon strike, draw two additional dragon tokens, and two more dragon tokens for each additional dragon strike you draw in this way. Choose one of the dragon tokens you drew except dragon strikes, and discard the other tokens you drew.

3. Resolve the dragon token you drew. (If you drew one or more dragon strikes, only resolve the dragon token you chose and ignore the others.) The dragon rage and dragon slumber are resolved as normal and then discarded. If you drew a dragon scale, place the dragon scale on your current space, and move one matching dragon scale from the pool next to the dragon lords onto the matching dragon lord. If the dragon lord now holds three dragon scales, that dragon lord becomes the new dragon king and all three dragon scales on that dragon lord are moved back to the pool next to the dragon lords.

4. If your current space contains a dragon scale (either because it was there before you arrived or because you just drew it), draw the number of cards that is indicated on the space from the dragon deck that matches the dragon scale. If the space already contains one or more cards, only draw enough cards to make up for the indicated amount of cards. (For example, the red dragon is the current dragon king. The player lands on a "draw 3 cards" space that already contains one gold dragon card and one sword from the purchase deck. The player draws a green dragon scale. Since the space already contains 2 cards, the player draws one more card from the green dragon deck for a total of three cards.) If your current space does not contain any dragon scales, do not draw any cards.

5. If your current space contains a dragon scale, but no cards with an enemy, discard the dragon scale.

6. Encounter the cards on your current space as per the normal rules. You may evade creatures and use spells against creatures as per the normal rules (ignore the dragon expansion rule that states that creatures in the dragon tower cannot be evaded or targeted by spells and abilities).

7. If your current space contains a dragon scale, and you defeat or otherwise dispose of every single enemy on the space, you may take the dragon scale for yourself, which grants the regular benefits. If at least one enemy remains on the space, the dragon scale also remains on the space.

Do not remove any cards or tokens at the end of your turn. Cards and tokens remain on the dragon tower spaces.

Certain cards allow players to take dragon scales directly from the dragon lords. When this occurs, refill the pool of dragon scales next to the dragon lords from the discard pile so that the pool and the dragon lords together hold a total of three scales of each color. If there are not enough dragon scales available in the discard pile, use other tokens as temporary replacements.

THE DRAGON THRONE:

When a player reaches the dragon throne, that player must end his or her move, even if the player has more movement available.

When a player ends his or her move on the dragon throne, the player must fight the current dragon king. The dragon king cannot be evaded, and the player cannot use followers or spells to fight instead of the player, but other spells and follower bonuses are allowed as normal (including spells that would instantly kill the dragon king). The dragon king does not have multiple lives, and only needs to be defeated once.

If the player defeats the dragon king, the player may search through the matching dragon deck, and take either one item or follower of the player's choice from the dragon deck or a talisman from the talisman deck. Shuffle the deck after. The player then teleports to any outer or middle region space of the player's choice, and encounters that space (or another player on that space) as per the normal rules.

If the dragon king defeats the player, the player loses a life and then suffers the dragon rage effects. If the player survives, he or she is instantly teleported to the village. If the fight ends in a stand-off, the player does not lose a life or suffer the dragon rage effects, but is still instantly teleported to the village. After being teleported to the village, the player encounters the village (or another player in the village) as per the normal rules.

If a player is slain by the dragon king, all items, followers and gold held by that player are placed on the dragon throne. The next player to defeat any dragon king may take those items, followers and gold in addition to the one item or follower from the dragon deck or talisman deck, before teleporting to the outer or middle region.

Defeating a dragon king does not close off the dragon tower. Any player, including the player that just defeated the dragon king, may travel to the dragon throne again to defeat the same or another dragon king. Challenging a dragon king also does not block the other dragon lords from becoming the dragon king at a later time.


Edited by Thels, 15 April 2014 - 03:02 AM.


#26 DomaGB

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Posted 15 April 2014 - 05:41 PM

Interesting, I think the Dragon center board is a bit boring for this kind of thing, I think an extra Highlands works awesome. But for someone who doesn't wanna spend the extra money it would work. Still debating about creating a new board, or using someone else's Dragon board that is already made...that fan created board would also be better than using the center board, in my opinion. However I don't like the 2 endings and would replace them with 2 random Dragon Lords.

It is nice to see someone else using a 2nd edition board to play 4th edition! I recently stopped doing this cause I bought 2 new tables.

RoboRally, then Talisman. That's the way it is... ;)


#27 Thels

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 06:10 AM

I use the original 4th edition board from Black Industries in combination with FFG's upgrade set. The upgrade set contains basically everything from the revised edition, except the board, the 1 and 5 point markers and the manual, and instead provides a small readout about the differences between BI's 4th edition and FFG's revised 4th edition.

 

I regret having bought the upgrade set and not the entire revised edition, as the board is smaller, which leads to misalignments with the corner expansions, and the dragon tower covers most of the middle region squares, making it very messy to place cards on the middle square. In addition, several squares were revised in FFG's revised edition, which is mentioned in the manual, but is annoying to keep track off. Finally, the checkers that were included in BI's edition still counted from 1 to 4, were all the same size, and their numbers are often very hard to read (they're shaped, not printed), making it pratically impossible to see at a glance how much life, strength or craft another player has. In addition, had I bought the revised edition, I could've gifted the original BI edition to a friend.

 

The variant rules I described above would allow you to use the dragon tower as a corner expansion instead of a replacement to the middle region (defeating the dragon king is similar to defeating the lord in the treasure chamber of the dungeon, and does not cause you to win the game), thereby still allowing most of the set's functionality for people that step into the tower, without causing the set to have a major impact on the entire game.



#28 The Hunter

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 11:43 AM

I recently learned that when introducing new players to the game, it's usually best to stick with the core game.
The only inconvenience would be to sift put the character and spell cards from the expansions as only the indivdual player would see them.
For the adventure deck, I the owner migt have to act as a sort of game master, discarding the cards from expansions until the core game cards are drawn.

Edited by The Hunter, 16 April 2014 - 12:20 PM.


#29 Thels

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 03:13 PM

Honestly, I don't think it's much of an issue to add all the extra characters, adventure cards and spells, as these aren't things you need to explain in detail beforehand.

 

Regardless of your deck containing 60 or 600 adventure cards, players are only going to draw 1 adventure card on the fields, hills, plains or woods or 2 adventure cards on the ruins, and read those specific cards. Therefor, it is not additional information that is coming at new players, or additional options they can choose among.

 

On the other hand, adding actually different elements to the game, such as the reaper and the werewolf, day and night, warlock quests and rewards, alternative endings, extra boards or dragon tokens adds additional information and rules that players need to be aware of and might overload them. (Of course, if you draw a card that refers to one of these extra elements, it's best to immediately discard that card and draw a new one.)


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#30 Artaterxes

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 03:18 PM

I recently learned that when introducing new players to the game, it's usually best to stick with the core game.

Yes, I think this is true for almost any expandable game. With Talisman I put the components back into their boxes every time. I sift through all the cards and characters and everything else and put them back.

 

A person has to really know the basic game well to reach the point where they want more. The basic game has 104 Adventure Cards. Think about how many plays will be necessary before that becomes boring (and considering Talisman's design already has high replay value). If you meet with a person only two or three times a year, and assuming you play Talisman every time, imagine how long it will take before you bring out The Reaper.

 

Considering the population as a whole, it's rare to find a person or group so interested in Talisman that they want to expand it. Once you find the right group, then it's perfect; but most of my games (all people considered) have been with just the core game.



#31 DomaGB

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 05:02 PM

I have never had anyone have a problem learning or playing Talisman. Yeah, of coarse there are always rule problems for some cards...

The last few months my 10 year old son has been having his friends come over and they play Talisman quite well.

RoboRally, then Talisman. That's the way it is... ;)





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