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Can members of the ecclisiarchy marry?


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#1 tothedogs

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Posted 01 March 2014 - 12:15 PM

This may seem like a weird question, but my character is a missionary and knowing this will give me a better idea as to how I can play him.  Is he allowed to marry, or is he supposed to be celibate?  I haven't found anything on the wikia that explicitly stated that members of the ecclisarchy couldn't marry, but I see the Adeptus Ministorum as a futuristic version of the Catholic church (in that there are rankings, like Ecclisarch/Pope, and they both start crusades).  Catholics priests are supposed to be celibate, so I was wondering if that was the case with missionaries.



#2 jabberwoky

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Posted 01 March 2014 - 12:27 PM

The Imperial Cult has one binding creed: Worship the God-Emperor of Man.  Other than that, there seems to be a free-for-all in values, philosophies and rituals.  There are billions of variations on this religion, and in fact, many members believe they have the one true interpretation and will burn any members of a different sect, even though they are supposed to be on the same side.

 

Missionaries are similarly varied.  There are orders that are celibate, ones that promote human sacrifice, there are orders that forbid use of cybernetics, ones who forbid the eating of oranges on Thursdays, and there may still be other orders that encourage the Missionary to take up a harem of converted heathens in order to create a population of "true" Imperial citizens.  The choice is entirely yours to make (pending your GM's approval, of course).


Edited by jabberwoky, 01 March 2014 - 12:31 PM.

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#3 Ansalagon

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Posted 01 March 2014 - 12:33 PM

I would say no... and from all my 40k experience, it would be a 100% guess... I would guess sisters of battle would be a no-go... i DO believe that i read something about the sister hospitalars can... I think its in Gunheads but don't blame me if i got the name wrong... but its one of the guardsmen who remarks something about "i wish i could get one of the Hospitalar sisters but oonly the officcers would have a chance with those" ... but its a long time i read it my memmory could be way off...



#4 Lynata

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Posted 01 March 2014 - 01:57 PM

I'm with jabberwoky on this. Whilst the Imperial faith is clearly inspired by Catholic Christianity ("He died for your sins!" "Abhor the witch!" "Your betters are divinely appointed!", not to mention the many visual similarities in the mainstream Ministorum), the original source material mentions room for so many local deviations that marriage is certainly one of the least notable differences between one world and another.

 

Of course, the fluff is malleable and open to interpretation, which means that it is possible that some officially licensed products may sometimes evoke different ideas, or that your group itself may opt to pursue its own ideas over something a book says. So, ultimately it is your own decision, but in GW's vision of 40k, I am fairly certain that clerics marrying would be okay at least on some Imperial worlds.

 

I would guess sisters of battle would be a no-go... i DO believe that i read something about the sister hospitalars can... I think its in Gunheads but don't blame me if i got the name wrong... but its one of the guardsmen who remarks something about "i wish i could get one of the Hospitalar sisters but oonly the officcers would have a chance with those" ... but its a long time i read it my memmory could be way off...

 

A good example for the aforementioned differences between the sources!

 

As per Codex fluff, all Sisters live in isolated convents and "brook no distraction from their duties" - but one of the Cain novels contradicts this and even has the protagonist flirt with some veteran SoB (who, again by Codex fluff, should not even be present at the location he meets her).

It's just one of the examples where you have to pick and choose which version of 40k you follow. At times, FFG's books also depict things differently than you may have read in either a Codex or a Black Library novel.



#5 Amazing Larry

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Posted 01 March 2014 - 02:04 PM

Has anyone read faith and coin? Hostile Aquisitions talks a bit about "ecclesiarchal law" but doesn't get into really gritty detail about what all it entails. Personally I think it's a safe bet to just apply the most batshit fundie nonsense you can think of, but even in the real world there's more than one kind of crazy fundie.

 

I think what you should do is just flesh out the background of your character's order/sect, establish the basic tenets and traditions of their variation on the Imperial Creed.


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#6 Fortinbras

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Posted 01 March 2014 - 02:47 PM

Has anyone read faith and coin? Hostile Aquisitions talks a bit about "ecclesiarchal law" but doesn't get into really gritty detail about what all it entails. Personally I think it's a safe bet to just apply the most batshit fundie nonsense you can think of, but even in the real world there's more than one kind of crazy fundie.

 

 

If you do this, you're risking caricaturizing yourself into a "Reverend Strawman" stereotype, which is about as clever and inspired as a priest who always wants to have sex with kids.



#7 Lynata

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Posted 01 March 2014 - 05:49 PM

Though 40k thrives on stereotypes. It is not a very subtle setting.  :D

 

The trick is to take a stereotype and still give him or her a sufficient amount of personality and background so as to not make them a cardboard cutout. Done correctly, I feel that such characters can indeed enrich the atmosphere by inserting critical elements of the background into play.

 

Just look at the novels. Some of them do it right, others ... not so much, simply because it can be a very tricky thing for the author and requires a careful approach as well as good knowledge of the background. Of course it also comes down to what the reader expects ... *coughbolterporncough*



#8 Amazing Larry

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Posted 01 March 2014 - 06:00 PM

If you do this, you're risking caricaturizing yourself into a "Reverend Strawman" stereotype, which is about as clever and inspired as a priest who always wants to have sex with kids.

 

Unfortunately as soon as you go with the Missionary career it's a real challenge to do much else but reverend strawman, especially in a setting where we the fanbase know for a fact that that even the most noble and reasonable of those within the Emperor's Church are still always pretty tragically misguided figures because we know the Emperor  never actually wanted any of this and despised religion and the worship of gods and only likely continues to struggle on in the small hope that someday humanity will collectively pull their heads out of their asses.

 

I think more than any other class it's hard to find pathos with the missionary, it's going to require some serious writing to come up with something that's the least bit interesting or more than one dimensional. So far in any of the games I've been affiliated with nobody has ever wanted to play the class and frankly that doesn't surprise me much.



#9 Cogniczar

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Posted 01 March 2014 - 08:14 PM

No official answer has been given, but I can certainly extrapolate the answer being "celibacy is not required" due to certain key historical figures in the canonical setting being particularly renown as being celibate (Sebastian Thor, for example). If the Ecclesiarchy had celibacy as a prime edict, I don't think the deliberate mentioninig of these traits with certain saints would be needed to be made.

 

Although, I have to be fair - Sebastian Thor is my example I'm using and he technically wasn't part of the Ecclesiarchy until he reformed it.  (I'm grossly over simplifying)

 

 

As per Codex fluff, all Sisters live in isolated convents and "brook no distraction from their duties" - but one of the Cain novels contradicts this and even has the protagonist flirt with some veteran SoB (who, again by Codex fluff, should not even be present at the location he meets her).

It's just one of the examples where you have to pick and choose which version of 40k you follow. At times, FFG's books also depict things differently than you may have read in either a Codex or a Black Library novel.

 

Is this really a contridiction? I'm a big fan of that particular novel, and I never really saw that as a canonical break from the codex. From my understanding, Adeptus Sororitas do not retire. I might have read between the lines, but I always felt her presence in the Schola Progenium was a political move to allow an honored sister to continue to serve the Imperium despite some rather...obvious deviancy from the convent she came from. Even the sisterhood succumbs to mundane politics, ya know? =D


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#10 Lynata

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Posted 01 March 2014 - 11:30 PM

[...] because we know the Emperor  never actually wanted any of this and despised religion and the worship of gods

 

Only according to some Black Library novel series, some contents of which have already been contradicted by newer studio material. I feel this needs pointing out because I noticed a lot of people soak up such details as if they were gospel.

Until just a few years ago, I did, too, because I was stuck in the belief that it's all supposed to tie together.

 

Agreed about the rest of your post, though!

 

Is this really a contridiction? I'm a big fan of that particular novel, and I never really saw that as a canonical break from the codex. From my understanding, Adeptus Sororitas do not retire. I might have read between the lines, but I always felt her presence in the Schola Progenium was a political move to allow an honored sister to continue to serve the Imperium despite some rather...obvious deviancy from the convent she came from. Even the sisterhood succumbs to mundane politics, ya know? =D

 

Technically, there's nothing "wrong" with a Sister transferring into other branches of the Imperium at all - in fact, the Codex notes this as a regular occurrence for older Sororitas, though transfers into other Orders are more common. However, Codex fluff also notes that the Schola Progenium enforces complete separation of the genders, and that the lifestyle of its teachers is strict and puritan. They have these rules in place to prevent the Scholae from returning to the corrupted state they were in during Vandire's rule, and because the Ecclesiarchy believes that only with this "spiritual purity" the students will be fit to serve where they end up going.

 

In short: the Schola practices nothing less than complete and total brainwashing. It has to, in order to transform at least a portion of its male and female students into fearless warriors that have such a twisted morality that they can function like good little robots for an oppressive state, and who do not back down from even the most cruel assignments.

 

Obviously, neither the gender separation, nor the lifestyle of its teachers, nor of the Sororitas itself as suggested by the Codex is mirrored in the novel. Instead, we are treated to a veteran of the Sisterhood - a "penitent organisation" practicing "constant hardship, deprivation and arduous work" and self-mutilation on a daily basis as part of their faith - suddenly being available for a flirt. She also drinks, and she plays cards. All the while whilst being in charge of training the next generation of Sisters, certainly a task entrusted only to the most suitable and exemplary teachers...  <_<

 

If this were not 40k, fiction of this nature would probably be called Nunsploitation.

 

Though, in GW fluff, the Schola does not even have Sororitas Novice classes to begin with. Prospective candidates are hand-picked by the Arch Drill-Abbot at about age 12 and submitted to the Adepta Sororitas for evaluation by the Orders Famulous. They only begin their novitiate once they actually transfer into one of the Orders' training facilities, where they are to serve for about 4-6 years until being sent to Holy Terra to take their vows in a ceremony led by the Ecclesiarch, finally becoming elevated to the status of full Sister and then formally "adopted" by a Sister Superior from the convent and squad they have been assigned to.

 

Judging from the old background on Commissar Training Squads, I suspect it is similar for the other progena, the Schola only being there to shape the children into indoctrinated servants for the state, then turning them over to other agencies to be trained accordingly. Considering just how many branches of the Imperium receive Schola students, this would also make sense on a logistical level - unless we are to believe that every Schola is supposed to have hundreds of different classes, like some big university rather than the grimdark 40k equivalent of a mixture between orphanage and NaPolA.

 

I am not sure if the author did not knew of these details (I have a feeling Mr. Mitchell may have completely missed that most Schola students end up in civilian service, with only those of a particularly suitable mindset being sent to the military) or simply did not care for them - after all, his own ideas would be just as valid as the studio fluff. That does not necessarily make them fit into the established material any easier, though. As popular as his novels are, I am of the opinion that a Commissar is one of the most supremely inappropriate choices imaginable to write a funny book about. May as well have written a comedy about a Space Marine or an Inquisitor.

 

It's not impossible to write funny stuff in 40k. But, please, there would have been much more appropriate options to pick from. The authors of the Redeemer and Kal Jerico comics knew this. ;)

 

That being said, in licensed products, the Sisterhood is rarely portrayed in a way that actually mirrors GW's own material, so it would be unfair to single out the Cain novels as the only "culprit". I am of the opinion that such portrayals do not have a good effect on how this faction is perceived by the fandom as a whole, though - both their capabilities as well as their very nature - so please forgive me if I sound somewhat wistful when it comes to topics such as this.

 

(also, this reply has become way longer than it was supposed to .. again, apologies)


Edited by Lynata, 01 March 2014 - 11:40 PM.

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#11 Amazing Larry

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 04:26 AM

Only according to some Black Library novel series, some contents of which have already been contradicted by newer studio material. I feel this needs pointing out because I noticed a lot of people soak up such details as if they were gospel.

Until just a few years ago, I did, too, because I was stuck in the belief that it's all supposed to tie together.

 

I know it's filled with holes and contradictions and like any expanded universe stuff you can pick and choose as you like, for instance I'll put Kroot in my game but the Tau will NEVER show up in any campaign I run. Right there I'm deliberately ignoring and even denying the very existence of one of the major canonical armies, because I think they were nothing but a dopey way by GW to try and draw in the teenage anime fans. On the other hand I might just go nuts and throw the Squats into a campaign because trains made out of tanks are hilariously awesome and I don't care if GW says they've all been eaten by the Nids.

 

Anyway as to the stuff we were both referring to regarding the Emperor's origin as far as I know it's still the most widely accepted origin story he has and it's an optional part of the setting I don't have a problem with, now arguably maybe he never needed one maybe mystique was better. Frankly coming up with explanations to things that didn't necessarily need them is a great way to **** **** up. See Mass Effect 3's ending for a great recent example.



#12 venkelos

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 08:04 AM

Ever notice how the Imperium strives to protect the future of Humanity, yet everything about "being human" is bad, and forced down or out at some level of their indoctrination? It's almost like Jedi in Star Wars; droids can't use the Force, and Jedi don't much care for droids one way or the other, but the Masters on the Council, and indeed many of the Jedi teachings specifically intend to try and make you a droid in mentality. All those feelings, urges, wants, and desires, those things that make you strive to improve yourself (probably at the expense of another), and be "human" (or whatever race you are), are what they try to quash out of you, so that you can be just another drone for the Order. The Sith aren't often much better, with their craziness and backstabbing, but at least they act like who they are, on the way to becoming someone worse.

 

Thanks Imperium for helping secure the future of Humanity, by cutting out the middle man, and just making up all lobotomized servitors now. :P

 

On marriage of Priests, as it were, I think they wouldn't really care. Honestly, I don't know how most people in the Imperium breed, with you living your entire life within yards of one spot you will always work at, toiling endlessly. If you are military, you are busy fighting, and if you have a kid, I'd guess they just shuttle them off to the Schola Progenium, and either throw you back into the fray, or shoot you, if your choice of partner was inappropriate. I never see a strata of 40K society where you have "free time", maybe go down to the bar on your off hours, and drink, then pick up a stranger, and plan for if you die tomorrow; everyone seems to be just a drone of their station, with oversight drones watching to keep you productive. The Emperor did say be fruitful, so He probably wouldn't care if the Priests had children; you just might not be a part of their lives. As for marriage, the institution would likely have little value in the Imperium's society. I won't sit here and babble about the goods, bads, and and reasons of marriage, but I don't see the Imperium having a lot of it., certainly not you-choose, compared to your family chose. If you were a Rogue Trader, or other powerful noble, then there might be reasons, but not for the average joe.



#13 Lynata

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 09:08 AM

Anyway as to the stuff we were both referring to regarding the Emperor's origin as far as I know it's still the most widely accepted origin story he has and it's an optional part of the setting I don't have a problem with, now arguably maybe he never needed one maybe mystique was better. Frankly coming up with explanations to things that didn't necessarily need them is a great way to **** **** up.

 

Yep, especially when you turn the setting into a comic book universe with Primarchs who are tougher than Superman and get reborn on the odd chance that something actually kills them. I'm just very lucky that GW kept this OTT stuff out of their studio books, though it grinds my gears to see how many people swallow the novels just because it's an officially licensed product - seemingly not realising that it is, as you say, optional.

 

Personally, I prefer the Great Crusade era as a time of legends and mysticism. Kind of like the Arthurian saga or the stuff the bible claims. I guess it depends on one's individual preferences, though - meaning, whether you'd prefer the setting as some sort of gritty horror sci-fi or an epic fantasy movie with laser guns.

 

It may be of interest to you that Squats are mentioned in the 6E TT rulebook, though, as an abhuman strain like Ogryns and Ratlings.

 

And I must be one of the few people who never had a problem with the original ending to ME3... Headcanon ftw!   :lol:

 

Ever notice how the Imperium strives to protect the future of Humanity, yet everything about "being human" is bad, and forced down or out at some level of their indoctrination?

 

This kind of dystopia is one of the setting's most prominent features, I'd say - and surely one of the reasons why it is so popular! "Dark fantasy" is refreshing specifically because it's not done so often, especially not at the almost (or sometimes actual) ridiculous levels of 40k.  ;)

 

Honestly, I don't know how most people in the Imperium breed, with you living your entire life within yards of one spot you will always work at, toiling endlessly. If you are military, you are busy fighting, and if you have a kid, I'd guess they just shuttle them off to the Schola Progenium, and either throw you back into the fray, or shoot you, if your choice of partner was inappropriate.

 

I always interpreted the Schola to be reserved for the children of higher-level servants like officers, not some common foot-soldier. IG Codex fluff had a bit about "Whiteshields" that mentioned children of soldiers simply staying with the regiment's baggage train until they are old enough to pick up a weapon themselves, joining their fathers (or mothers) in service.

Aside from merging the unit with another understrength formation, this is one of the very few ways a regiment may gain reinforcements for its casualties. Once off-world, they are essentially cut off from home. Forever.

 

But even on a Hive world, I'm sure getting kids is quite easy! I think the whole bit about having only a few hours of sleep each day is inspired by real world conditions of living during the industrial age. Child labour and 12-16 hour shifts are no grimdark invention, this was the harsh reality in 18th century England! And still, people found time to procreate. In fact, looking at current population developments throughout the world, it seems that populations in harsh environments are more prone to procreate than ones living in luxury. In part, this may be because of an understanding that one's children will help with maintaining the family, earning money to buy food or helping out on your farm. Sex being a form of cheap entertainment may play a role, too.

And then, of course, there are the street gangs who set their own rules of living ...

 

Then there are Feral, Feudal and Agri Worlds, where life may be no different to ancient and medieval Earth. And on Forge Worlds, I believe procreation may even be organised by a machine, setting schedules and selecting your partner for you. Ever watched the movie THX 1138? Kind of like that, just with more oil and rust. ;)


Edited by Lynata, 02 March 2014 - 09:11 AM.


#14 Fortinbras

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 11:56 AM

 

 

Unfortunately as soon as you go with the Missionary career it's a real challenge to do much else but reverend strawman, especially in a setting where we the fanbase know for a fact that that even the most noble and reasonable of those within the Emperor's Church are still always pretty tragically misguided figures because we know the Emperor  never actually wanted any of this and despised religion and the worship of gods and only likely continues to struggle on in the small hope that someday humanity will collectively pull their heads out of their asses.

 

 

 

Only amateur, uncreative hacks keep themselves in that little box.  


Edited by Fortinbras, 02 March 2014 - 11:56 AM.


#15 Annaamarth

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 01:46 PM

"Catholic" priest-strawman- Pleasure is a sin because it distracts from duty.  Union under the God-Emperor is blessed in his sight, and therefore only blessed unions should be permitted (i.e. marriage).  The priesthood, however, cleaves only unto the word of Him-On-Earth. (Ecclesiarchs are 'wedded' to the God-Emperor and the Church of Man).

 

"Mormon" priest-strawman- All men are the servants of Him-On-Earth.  As it is the duty of the Techpriests to create blessed machines to serve the will of the Emperor, so it is the duty of the Priests to father blessed children, in his most holy name, that they may serve his Imperial will. (Thus an argument for polygamy in pursuit of providing as many future servants of "high-quality" as possible, bearing in mind that the children of a priest will have higher station than many others- a church like that could fuel a Schola all on its own).

 

Here we have two fundamentalist viewpoints, one which permits no marriage, and one which permits polygamy.  Your priest can fall anywhere between these two extremes.


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RIP AND TEAR THROUGH THE TIDE OF BLOOD WITH BATTLESUIT PILOT. SUPLEX HIVE TYRANTS. DO WHATEVER, YOU'RE PILOTING A HUGE-ASS MECHA.

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#16 Amazing Larry

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 02:04 PM

Only amateur, uncreative hacks keep themselves in that little box. 

 

In a fairly standard interpretation of the setting? Hell forget expanded universe novels for the moment. The depiction of the ecclisiarchy tends toward the goofy and satirical across the board, it deliberately models itself on and makes fun of the catholic church and it's role in the last thousand+ years of real life human history. For crying out loud the picture of the missionary in the core rulebook has him holding a bible in one hand and a flamethrower in the other while bellowing like some kind of crazy person. I think that sets the tone pretty clearly.

 

You say it's hack writing to go with something resembling that? I say it's being consistent with all the established material,  and maintaining as much consistency as possible is the cornerstone of good worldbuilding which is necessary for immersion and for getting everyone on the same page so that you actually can experience a story and a setting.

 

If you wanna be a true blue good guy you're probably playing the wrong game here, and you're definitely playing a game in the wrong setting because that's what 40k is it's deliberately ugly and satirical. At least when it's written by someone other than Matt ******* Ward or someone else like him anyway.



#17 Annaamarth

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 04:23 PM

Larry- What you say is, more or less, true.  That said, some players- and Fortinbras may be one of them- enjoy turning stereotypes like that on their heads.  The polygamist fundie Mormon-model is one example, as it's explicitly using an example that isn't the Catholic church but still fits in established canon.  You could just as easily build and play a character using the shaolin monks as a template for an Ecclesiarch/chaplain, leading his charges in meditation rather than bombastic prayer and wearing mesh robes and fighting with a polearm, monoedged hook-swords, or other esoteric tools.  You could kit a cleric out in full guardsman/stormtrooper gear, the only obvious symbol of his faith being his rosarius, as he leads from the front- this character might choose to witness rather than proselytize.

 

There is no reason that a navigator must be a twisted mutant (until gameplay forces it), and there is no reason a psyker has to look like a withered hunchback.  These are simply common portrayals, but by no means the end-all be-all.

 

There is room at the foot of the Golden Throne for all walks of life... except of course the Alien, the Mutant, and the Heretic.


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RIP AND TEAR THROUGH THE TIDE OF BLOOD WITH BATTLESUIT PILOT. SUPLEX HIVE TYRANTS. DO WHATEVER, YOU'RE PILOTING A HUGE-ASS MECHA.

 -Errant, on how Rogue Trader ought to be played


#18 Lynata

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Posted 03 March 2014 - 12:22 AM

In my experience, an intention to deviate from the norm usually comes with a heavy risk of changing the atmosphere of the setting - and thus the game. I'm sure we all draw our own lines differently, but to me it is a matter of balancing a character's advantages and disadvantages, strengths and weaknesses. It is the latter in particularly that shape and define a character the most.

 

To take the examples of Navigators and Psykers, depending on the books you read there is a strong tendency (GW's Inquisitor game actually had a rule for mutations written into the Navigator class), and a player voicing a strong interest to avoid such things rings certain "Special Snowflake" alarm bells with me. But perhaps I am being unfair from having seen too many such characters in action, both from other players as well as even professional novel authors (see above). Burnt child dreads the fire and all that.

 

Either way, someone who wants to appear normal might be better suited with a character archetype where this can be expected. Yes, all player characters are special by default, yet I am convinced that they end up more believable if the player limits this nature to above-average ability, whilst retaining the willingness to compromise and not forget to strive towards the aforementioned balance. Really depends on the group, though, and their idea of the setting and what sort of style they want to go for.

 

tl;dr: Everything comes at a price.



#19 Amazing Larry

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Posted 03 March 2014 - 01:23 AM

The polygamist fundie Mormon-model is one example, as it's explicitly using an example that isn't the Catholic church but still fits in established canon.  You could just as easily build and play a character using the shaolin monks as a template for an Ecclesiarch/chaplain, leading his charges in meditation rather than bombastic prayer and wearing mesh robes and fighting with a polearm, monoedged hook-swords, or other esoteric tools.  You could kit a cleric out in full guardsman/stormtrooper gear, the only obvious symbol of his faith being his rosarius, as he leads from the front- this character might choose to witness rather than proselytize.

 

I wouldn't have a problem with any of that, you misunderstand me if you think I would. I think all those ideas are totally in line with the spirit of the Missionary Career and the setting so long as you  maintain some level of dogmatism and pig headed craziness to go along with them. The Missionary's defining ability is "pure faith" an ability whereby he's so damned sure of his own righteousness he's somehow able to warp reality and unreality into going along with it to a limited extent. My objection was to the concept of the non-******* missionary concept because the Imperium is built and operated on assholery. It's one redeeming feature is that it's surrounded by people who are even more awful and who would kill everyone if given the chance.

 

To take the examples of Navigators and Psykers, depending on the books you read there is a strong tendency (GW's Inquisitor game actually had a rule for mutations written into the Navigator class), and a player voicing a strong interest to avoid such things rings certain "Special Snowflake" alarm bells with me. But perhaps I am being unfair from having seen too many such characters in action, both from other players as well as even professional novel authors (see above). Burnt child dreads the fire and all that.

 

The real fun is in subverting it, my sister wants to play a Navigator with exactly that complex just so she can roleplay the character losing her **** when she does mutate.


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#20 Annaamarth

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Posted 03 March 2014 - 05:55 AM

Dogmatism and pigheaded craziness are hardly unique to missionaries.  Commissar what? Puritanical Inquisitor what? Techpriest what? Black Templar, Grey Knight, Dark Angel, Death Korps, Steel Legion, Gue'vesa what?

 

... Actually, that's kind of a fun idea.  Play a Gue'vesa 'missionary,' whose faith in the Greater Good is what permits him to do the bullpucky missionaries do.  Spread the word of the Greater Good, dodge the Inquisition and report back to your masters along the way.  Maybe even infiltrate the Ecclesiarchy by piggybacking on the humanist doctrines of the Imperial Cult.  Now there's a subversion.  (inb4 'Pure Faith is the protection of the dead guy on the shiny chair.'  Bull.  Faith is all it takes, he's just a common symbol of that faith... by one common interpretation anyway, you run your game the way you want.)


RIP AND TEAR THROUGH THE TIDE OF BLOOD WITH BATTLESUIT PILOT. SUPLEX HIVE TYRANTS. DO WHATEVER, YOU'RE PILOTING A HUGE-ASS MECHA.

 -Errant, on how Rogue Trader ought to be played





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